Profiles of all of our former bachelor, master or PhD students:

Name Picture Objectives of study

Else de Ridder

28.2. - 4.4.2015

Feldstation Dahab

Else de Ridder

My name is Else de Ridder and I am 21 years old. Currently, I am studying Biology at Utrecht University in The Netherlands, which I enjoy very much. From the beginning on, the subjects about marine life were the most interesting to me. That’s no coincidence, because I wanted to study Biology ever since I got my PADI certificate in 2011 in Curacao. I was so amazed that I wanted to know everything about corals and the life around the reef. But sadly, I also learned about the degradation of coral reefs all over the world. With the Dahab Reef Monitoring project, I feel like I can really make a difference for the conservation of the reefs here. It is something I am very passionate about, so I hope I can continue doing this in the future!

Vanessa Kuhs

20.2.-18.5.2015

Fieldstation Dahab

Vanessa Kuhs Hey, my name is Vanessa and I am 32 years old. Currently I am studying „Marine ecosystems and fisheries sciences“ at the university of Hamburg . The next three months I will spend in Dahab, joining the „Dahab Reef Monitoring Project“ from the RSEC. There I will sample data for my master thesis on fish diversity in relation to the tides. The data collection will take place in Lighthouse Reef at Masbat Bay. My main interest lies in reef flat and reef crest as habitats. I will conduct transects to determine fish populations in these areas. Therefore I will spend a lot of time at the sea where I feel the most at home. The diversity and protection of coral reefs are very important to me. With my master thesis I want to gain a deeper understanding of this complex and species-rich ecosystem.

Janina Goetz

30.1.-30.5.2015

Fieldstation Dahab

Janina Goetz Hello again, my name is Janina Goetz and this time I am here in Dahab for my PhD research. I know the station from my previous master study and I am happy to be back. This time I will research the ecology of the coral-feeding snail Drupella cornus. During the last decades scientist record an enormous population outbreak from this species worldwide which provoke a high coral damage.
 Drupella cornus feeds mostly on  Acropora and Monitipora corals, but the causes of the outbreak are still unknown. My study is designed to gain more knowledge about this small predator. I will monitor the different dive sides around Dahab, will have a look on the snail abundances, their coral preferences and their seasonal population change. Additional, I will check if other factors like colony size, coral diseases, damages or temperature have an affect on the populations.
Further I am doing some aquarium experiments, to find out more about the feeding behavior, the influence of the pH value and other factors. Beside, I have a snail kindergarten, where I am looking for the rate of growth and try to gain as many information about the life of Drupella cornus as possible.

Nadja Schedensack

12.10.-20.12.2014

Fieldstation Dahab

Nadja Schedensack Hi, my name is Nadja and I am studying Geology with focus on paleontology at the Freie University Berlin. In my master studies I attended some courses about coral reefs and the anthropocene, the age which is discussed as the present geological epoch. I developed a fascination for the coral reefs and their dwellers. However, I also learned a lot about the threats for the coral reefs in the anthropocene. The RSEC offers many interesting projects including the coral project, which is very important for the control of the evolution of the status of the coral reefs. I am very happy that I have the opportunity to participate on the project. After this I will conduct the fieldwork for my master’s thesis by investigating the impact of the tourists on the damage of the corals. I am very sure that I will learn a lot about the coral reef ecosystem in the Red Sea and I hope that I can make a small contribution to the protection of them?

Aylin Maria Aras

8.4.-14.6.2014

Fieldstation Dahab

Aylin Maria Aras Hi, my name is Aylin, I'm 28 years old and I'm studying at the Institute of Hydrobiology and Fishery Science of the University of Hamburg. Always my passion was the understanding and research of marine ecosystems and my interest in coral reefs with their awesome diversity and due to the massive threat by humans especially is very high. On one hand my master thesis engages with the acquisition of biodiversity and habitat preferences of the local fish community in different habitats of the Masbat Bay and other coral reefs around Dahab which show a different appearance of tourism. I observe 100 m² transects in which all fish and the substrate compositions were determined. In addition I join the Coral Project of the RSEC whereby I previously learned much about methods and background of scientific fieldwork. On the other hand I collect data to investigate natural events which are not anthropogenic to study their impacts on the local ecosystem. I hope to learn much about the Red Sea which is such a special ecosystem with a fascinating biodiversity and what we have to protect in any case.

Natascha Hourle

21.3.-16.4.2013

Fieldstation Dahab

Natascha Hourle Hey, my name is Natascha and I'm studying Biology and English at the University of Würzburg. Because I had such a nice time with the RSEC-crew and Sinai Divers Backpackers in September, I have decided to come back  to do my Bachelor thesis on cleaner-wrasse-interactions with anthias. Therefore, I join the daily RSEC-surveys with Nina and watch Labroides dimidiatus together with my buddy Jana. Gaining diving-experience and visiting the amazing dive sites of dahab are a beautiful addition to my work which make my stay in Dahab a wonderful time once again. 

Wiebke R.

28.2.-4.4.2013

Fieldstation Dahab

Wiebke Ralf I’m studying BioGeo-Analysis in the third year at the University of Trier and I’ll write my Bachelor-thesis about the Dahab Reef Monitoring i.e. anthropogenic influence on the indicator fish. I’ve been to Dahab for another project during the last summer. Because I learned a lot about the beautiful underwater world I wanted to come back as soon as possible to dive here again and of course to learn more about it. In the first few days we heard a lot about fishes and invertebrates and I hope I can memorise it soon.

Stephi Bodden

28.2.-6.6.2013

Fieldstation Dahab

Stephi Bodden Hi, my name is Stephi  Bodden, I’m 28 years old and I study “International Studies of Aquatic Tropical Ecology” at the University of Bremen. I have been to RSEC in El Quseir before but now I’d like to get to know the field station in Dahab. Besides participating in the Dahab Reef Monitoring, I will collect data for my Master’s thesis. Therefore I’m staying in Dahab until June. I am interested in sustainable tourism and the impact on corals reefs and fish using reefs as their habitat.

Hanna Scheuffele

31.1.-11.4.2013

Fieldstation Dahab

 

Hanna Scheuffele Hi, my name is Hanna and I’m 23 years old. I’m from Frankfurt, but I’m studying biology in Marburg in 6th semester. I´m especially interested in tropical marine biology and hope to work in this area later on. That is why I`ll write my bachelor thesis about Coralliophila violacea, a corallivorous snail feeding mainly on Porites. Therefor I currently collect data about their feeding habit and their microhabitat use. Furthermore I can practice on my diving skills and I get to know the coral reefs under a scientific point of view.

Swetlana Glaser

18.10.-20.12.2012

Fieldstation Dahab

Swetlana Glaser

Hey, my name is Swetlana and I am 26 years old. At present I study biology at the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-University in Bonn and I am collecting data for my bachelor thesis here in Dahab. During my studies my interests orientated towards zoology and the work with living animals. Therefor I decided to go to Dahab, where I am able to observe and study animals in their natural environment. Furthermore I’d like to apply for postgraduate master studies in Environmental Management after having reached my bachelor degree. By working in the field station of the Red Sea Environmental Centre (RSEC) I may gain some essential insights about how to plan, organize and perform environmental projects, that may be advantageous for my master study.

My bachelor thesis has the title „How do the Chaetodon species (Butterflyfish) of the Red Sea differ in their way of living, feeding, aggressive behaviour and social behaviour and what are the advantages of the different colour patterns?“. My motivation is to allow further insights in the various forms of behaviour of closely related butterflyfish and their reasons, so there might be drawn possible evolutionary conclusions. It should be kept in mind that any kind of survey executed within the activities of RSEC represent a contribution to the conservation of the Red Sea and its diversity, wherein I would like to participate.

Volkan Julio Cevik

27.9.-20.12.2012

Fieldstation Dahab

Volkan Julio Cevik Hi, my name is Volkan Julio Cevik, I am 28 years old and a biology student at the Rheinische Friedrich - Wilhelms - Universität Bonn . As part of my bachelor thesis on "aggressive behavior of Amphiprion bicinctus towards conspecifics" I am currently for data acquisition in Dahab. I will also examine and compare the overall aggressive behavior of coral fish. Last year I have already been  to Dahab as part of a zoological field trip by the University of Bonn in cooperation with the Red Sea Environmental Centre. The RSEC field station in Dahab offers young researchers the opportunity to perform well supervised field trials on the most beautiful reefs of Egypt. I hope in addition to the successful completion of my B.Sc. on an educational and enjoyable time in Dahab.

Alexander Kools

5.6.-12.7.2012

Fieldstation Dahab

Alexander Kools Hi! My name is Alex and I’m studying Biology in Hamburg, Germany. Here at the RSEC fieldstation I’m presently collecting data for my Bachelor thesis about the Sulfurdamsel (Pomacentrus sulfureus). Since I have been working here as a volunteer at the Dahab reef monitoring and conservation project last year I was really eager about coming back to work at the fieldstation again. And now I’m back again, not even a year later.

Moni Friedrich

3.5.-14.6.2012

Fieldstation Dahab

Moni Friedrich Moni is studying Biology at the University of Hamburg. In 2011 she finished her apprenticeship as Scientific Diver on Helgoland. At the moment she collects data for her Master-Thesis at the RSEC in Dahab. The topic of the thesis will be the development of Habitat Suitability Models regarding indicator coral reef fish species in Masbat Bay, Dahab.

Janina Götz

19.5.-7.7.2011

Fieldstation Dahab

Janina Götz My name is Janina Goetz and I am a master student from the university of Hamburg. My study here in Dahab is designed to gather extensive information about fish diversity. Data of fish abundance and substrate composition will be recorded by in situ observations along five stations, respectively 50m long, marked within the reef using snorkelling- techniques. The ambition is to compare the actual data with the results from previous programs. The study will be conducted in the course of a master's thesis. A period of seven weeks is intended for data collection, starting in May, and ending mid July, 2011.
  Hi, we are Sabrina, Anouk, Ana and Agnes and are aged 20 – 23 years. We are studying biology in the third year at the University of Tuebingen. We are now in Dahab to collect data for our respective Bachelor theses. Its topics result from a two-week field trip to the Red Sea at El Quseir. There we conducted a small project about the behaviour of the Striped Bristletooth Surgeonfish (Ctenochaetus striatus), in which we found that this species uses specific sand spots as ‘public toilets’. Being a detrivore it eats sediment off corals and hence this behaviour of the Striped Bristletooth is an important factor for sediment transport. So to speak this species cleans the reef from sediment and accumulates it on specific spots.

Agnes Förster

28.4.-14.6.2011

Fieldstation Dahab

Agnes Förster In my bachelor thesis I examine the effects that the behaviour of the Striped Bristletooth has on meiofauna living in the sediment. Since the utilisation of sand spots as toilets can be seen as an input of organic material, I expect a higher density and possibly a different composition of organisms living in the sediment at these spots in comparison to spots that are not used as ‘toilets’. I also compare the grain size of the sand between ‘toilets’ and other sand spots, because it is an important environmental factor for the fauna in the sediment.

Ana Rodriguez

28.4.-14.6.2011

Fieldstation Dahab

Ana Rodriguez

I am going to compare habitat features of the spots that are used as ’toilets‘ in order to find some patch characteristics that are preferred for their  ‘toilets’. Moreover I am going to combine this with a substrate analysis of the different areas where the toilets are located, as there are also ‘toilets’ over substrates other than sand. As we discovered here in Dahab this often occurs when no sand is available nearby.

Anouk Neuhaus

28.4.-14.6.2011

Fieldstation Dahab

Anouk Neuhaus I am going to analyse whether this ‘hygienic’ behaviour could possibly provide advantages in interspecific interactions. For this purpose I am observing the behaviour of the Arabian Surgeonfish (Acanthurus sohal) towards other surgeonfish species, which intrude into its rigorously defended territory. I expect less aggression against the Striped Bristletooth since it is no foraging competitor for the herbivorous Arabian Surgeonfish but rather helps enhancing algae growth by removing sediment. Therefore I additionally quantify the effect of the Striped Bristletooth on the amount of sediment and algae growth by means of exclusion experiments.

Sabrina Hug

28.4.-14.6.2011

Fieldstation Dahab

Sabrina Hug The aim of my bachelor thesis is to examine a possible intention of this specific behaviour for the Striped Bristletooth. It could be a parasite avoiding strategy, as they use ‘toilets’ away from their feeding grounds. Therefore I search for endoparasites in the faeces. Furthermore I examine the transport of organisms of the meso- and microfauna by the Striped Bristletooth from their feeding grounds to the ‘toilets’, what implicates an input of organic material.

Romana Gruber

6.8.-30.09.2010

Fieldstation Quseir

Romana
Romana studiert an der Universität Innsbruck Biologie im Bachelor und macht nächstes Jahr ihren Abschluss. Sie arbeitet, mit Hilfe des RSEC momentan an ihrer Bachelor-Arbeit über Coral Diseases im Roten Meer, insbesondere mit Augenmerk auf Coral Bleaching und Dark Spot Disease. Im September hilft Romana auch beim Coral Project mit und um Daten für ihre Arbeit zu sammeln.

Timo Tscharnke

31.8.-30.11.2010

Fieldstation Dahab

Timo
Hi, my name is Timo Tscharnke. I am 26 years old and a student of Biology at the University of Duesseldorf, though I write my diploma thesis at the Institut of Evolution Ecology and Biodiversity of Animals. My assignment includes the ecology of Vermetidae (worm shells) of Masbat Bay. I got my first impressions at the Great Barrier Reef (Heron Island) toghether with a small group of other students. It's a good chance for me to work close with the RSEC to learn more about the species and all biologic incidents in the Red Sea.

Anna Lohmar

Fieldstation Dahab

Anna Lohmar
"Konflikte zwischen Naturschutz und Natursport. Das Umweltbewusstsein von Sporttaucherinnen und Sporttauchern."

Johanna Zimmerhackel

28.1-11.3.2010

Fieldstation Dahab

Johanna

Preferences in Habitat of Dominant Fish Species in Masbat Bay, Dahab, South Sinai, Egypt

Johanna is studyind Biology at the University of Hamburg, Germany. Since some years she is working as a Divemaster in a diving centre in Brasil, where she gives awareness training for nature conservation. Her practical experience is supported by her studies, where she visited amongst others courses of fisheries and marine biodiversity. At the time Johanna is working at the “Red Sea Environmental Centre” on her Bachelor’s thesis “Preferences in Habitat of dominant Fish Species in Masbat Bay, South Sinai, Dahab”.            

Andreas Scharl

13.7.-14.9.2009

Fieldstation Quseir

Christian Cryptobenthic Fish Communities of the El Quadim Bay, El Quseir.

Christian Jessen

1.8.-

Fieldstation Quseir

Christian „Identification and effects of herbivorous fish on algae growth on the reef-flat in the El-Quseir-Region (Red Sea, Egypt)“

Peter Kohnert

Fieldstation Dahab

Peter Kohnert Survey on ophistobranch gastropods in the Gulf of Aqaba, with special focus on mesopsammic species.

Manuel Marinelli

Fieldstation Quseir

Manuel
Geboren bin ich am 25.10.1983 in Villach (Kärnten). Vom Meer und seinen Bewohnern war ich schon begeistert so lange ich denken kann und so begann ich nach Abschluss des Gymnasiums ein Bacchelorstudium der Biologe in Graz, welches ich in Kiel als Meeresbiologe abschloss. Für den Master in Ökologie verschlug es mich jetzt wieder zurück nach Österreich. In meiner "Freizeit" bin ich so weit wie möglich auch im/am oder vorzugsweise unter Wasser unterwegs, sei es als Tauchlehrer, beim Segeln oder auch als Aktivist.

Katrin Korczyk

20.4.- 12.9.2009

Fieldstation Quseir

Roland Krone

The Prey Catching Behavior of the Lionfish Pterois miles.

 

Julien Millet

April 2009

Fieldstation Dahab

Julien

“Ecological stability of mollusc communities of Indo-Pacific Quaternary coral reefs.”
Coral reefs are extremely diverse ecosystems, but they are also fragile and they are potentially very sensitive to sea level fluctuations and current climatic changes. Nevertheless mollusc communities, as scleractinian corals, seems to experience little change in spite of the dramatic climatic changes of the Quaternary with glaciations and high sea level fluctuations (till 140m under current sea level). The aim of this study is to test this hypothesis in comparing modern data to the Holocene and Pleistocene fossil record, focusing on community ecology: evolution of the composition of the communities, research of extinct species, modification of the geographic range of species, change in ecological behaviours etc.

Heike Mewis

April 2009

Fieldstation Dahab

Julien
I am working on the ecological stability of Indo-Pacific coral reefs during the dramatic Pleistocene climatic changes. See Julien Millet for detailed information. We want to learn from the past to gain a better understanding of what might happen to coral reefs during current und future climate change.

Roland Krone

28.2.-10.3.2009

Fieldstation Quseir

 

 

Roland Krone

Title of scientific project:
“The defecation behaviour of Ctenochaetus striatus

"The feeding and defecation behaviour of the surgeonfish Ctenochaetus striatus was described in detail from reef patches inside the Ras Mohammed National Park (South Sinai). The fish feed on coral rock mainly by sweeping loose sediment with their flexible broom like teeth into their mouths. Feeding occurred exclusively on coral rock, but defecation took place only outside the grazing area above sand in small, precisely defined areas. Now we are going to investigate the fish's behaviour and spatial distribution on a fringing reef far from Ras Mohammed in El Quseir.

 

Maya Bode

Februar / März 2009

Fieldstation Quseir

Maya

Natural and Influenced Behaviour of Dugong dugong in Abu Dabab in Marsa Alam, a Popular Dive Site in Egypt.

Results
Altogether the Dugong came into the bay on 18 out of 27 days. The average time spent in the bay by the Dugong was 6,4 (± 2,6) hours. 96,9% of the dives during underwater observations were foraging dives, during 3,1% he was resting or swimming on the bottom. The dive time averaged 296 (± 61) s (range 58-526 s), while the forage time averaged 273 (± 66) s (range 30-460 s). Forage times were about 21 (± 12) s shorter than dive times. The mean dive/forage depth was 7,3 (± 1,6) m (Figure 1). The Dugong made about nine (± 1,2) dives per hour. Altogether the Dugong spent an average of 78,8% of one hour deeper than 1,5 m under the surface, while 21,2% of one hour were spent within 1,5 m at the surface. Between dives the Dugong took a mean of 3,4 (± 1,4) breaths. Mostly he took two short breaths (1-2 s) followed by a longer third one (3-4 s) as he performed the forward roll to dive almost at right angle to the bottom. The intervals between the breaths averaged 28,6 (± 10) s. The mode of surfacing was in 98% of the cases horizontal even when weather conditions
were rough.

Katharina Fietz

Februar 2009

Fieldstation Dahab

Kathi
Reef fauna diversity in relation to habitat structure at an isolated patch reef in Masbat Bay, Dahab, South Sinai, Egypt

Jessica Weidenbörner

Januar - August 2009

Fieldstation Quseir

Jessica Studie zum territorialen Verhalten des Blaupunkt-Rochen Taeniura lymma in der El Quadim Bucht, El Quseir, Ägypten.

Andrea Crowther

Oktober 2008

Fieldstation Dahab

Stefan Ober

Taxonomy, phylogeny and evolution of sea anemones possessing branched tentacles and Spherical defensive structures: representatives found in Egypt.In the traditional classification, sea anemones that possess both branched outgrowths and spherical defensive structures belong to families Aliciidae and Thalassianthidae, which have not been thought to be each other’s closest relatives despite their similarity in gross morphology. Currently, Thalassianthidae are anemones which possess branched tentacles on the oral disc which are defended by nematospheres. Aliciidae members possess branched outgrowths of the column called pseudotentacles. Vesicles are attached to the pseudotentacles and defend these. Representatives are found throughout shallow tropical seas, and our overall plan is to study species found throughout this range. 

Stefan Ober

Juni 2008

Fieldstation Dahab

Stefan Ober

The dragonflies of the Sinai Peninsula

The survey will be a part of my doctoral thesis on the "Biogeography and Systematics of the Dragonflies of northeastern Africa”.

Sabrina Bleidissel

Mai 2008

Fieldstation Dahab

Sabrina at work

The swapped symbiont: Molecular identification of symbiotic dinoflagellates in the nudibranch seaslugs (Nudibranchia; Mollusca)

Aim of the project is to investigate the mutualistic symbiotic relationship between seaslugs (Aeolidoidea, Nudibranchia, Opisthobranchia) and dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. A main focus is the comparison of symbiont clade composition in seaslugs and their coral food organisms.

Gerlinde Aichinger

April-May 2007

Fieldstation Dahab

Gerlinde Aichinger

"Relationship between the mysid Idiomysis tsurnamali and coelenterates such as the anemone Megalactis hemprichi and the jellyfish Cassiopea andromeda"

 

Mario Freinschlag

April-May 2007

Fieldstation Dahab

Julia Schnetzer

"Studies on the gobiid and shrimp mutualism in the Gulf of Aqaba"

 

 

Svenja Hahn

March-October 2006

Fieldstation Dahab

Svenja Hahn

Study of some aspects of the biology, ecology and diversity of species of Porcellanidae (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura) in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea.

The species of the family Porcellanidae Haworth 1825 are distributed in tropical regions of all seas, and typically occupy hard substrates of the littoral and sublittoral zones. While the porcellanids of the American tropical seas have been extensively studied, there are still many knowledge gaps regarding the species of the Indo-West-Pacific, including the Red Sea. Lewinsohn (1969, 1974) described 14 species from the Red Sea, and further 3 species are being reported in an ongoing publication by colleagues of my research group (Werding & Hiller, in preparation).

Katja Tomaschäfsky

June - October 2005

Fieldstation Dahab

Katja Tomaschäfsky

Soft coral abundance, space availability for recolonization and aspects of the physical environment at reefs sites of the Gulf of Aqaba affected by outbreaks of the Crown–of–Thorns Starfish Acanthaster planci.

 

Yvonne Richter

June - October 2005

Fieldstation Dahab

Yvonne Richter

Coral reef recovery: Species composition and abundance of ascidians in reef sites having suffered from mass occurrences of Acanthaster planci in previous years

Miriam Reininger

June - September 2005

Fieldstation Dahab

Miriam Reininger

Studies on the aggression behaviour of Amphiprion bicinctus (Red Sea Anemone fish) against anemone predators and its reaction on enemy schemes.

My field studies took place from July 7 to September 29, 2005, at the Red Sea Environmental Centre (RSEC) in Dahab. During the first half of my stay I registered the exact sites of the anemone-fish-partnerships and the parameters of the surrounding area (e.g. depth, fish and anemone size, number of Anemone fish living in the anemones, etc.). After drawing up a behavioural catalogue I started my observations in 20-min.-intervals at four different depths (2m, 7m, 12m and 15m). During the second half of my studies I carried out fake experiments on A. bicinctus in order to see which fish contours would evoke more and which ones less aggression, to replenish my observation studies.